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Vitamin D deficiency link to ACS mortality

Severe vitamin D deficiency is independently associated with in-hospital cardiovascular mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes, according to a study1 published recently in the American Journal of Cardiology.

Researchers measured the 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels at admission of 206 patients with unstable angina, non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, or ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. Severe vitamin D deficiency was defined a priori as a value ≤10 ng/ml.

The average concentration of vitamin D was 20 ± 8.2 ng/ml, and 10% of patients were severely deficient. Cardiovascular mortality during hospitalisation took place in 14 patients, an incidence of 6.8%. Patients with severe vitamin D deficiency had in-hospital cardiovascular mortality of 24%, significantly higher than the 4.9% observed in the remaining patients.

After adjustment for Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score, Gensini angiographic score, and potential confounding variables, severe deficiency of vitamin D remained an independent predictor of in-hospital cardiovascular mortality (p = 0.03).

References

1. Correia LCL, Sodré F, Garcia G, et al. Relation of severe deficiency of vitamin D to cardiovascular mortality during acute coronary syndromes. Am J Cardiol 2012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.10.006

Published on: December 20, 2012

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  • ArrhythmiaAlliance
  • Stars
  • Anticoagulation Europe
  • Atrial Fibrillation Association
 

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