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ARTICLE CONTRIBUTORS

Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Clinical Articles, News & Views

New oral anticoagulants stake their claim

“New oral anticoagulants are poised to replace vitamin K antagonists for many patients with atrial fibrillation, and may have a role after acute coronary syndromes,” according to a review published recently in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.1

Until recently, vitamin K antagonists were the only available oral anticoagulants, but with numerous limitations that prompted the introduction of new oral anticoagulants targeting the single coagulation enzymes thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban) and given in fixed doses without coagulation monitoring.

Members of the European Society of Cardiology Task Force on Anticoagulants review the pharmacology and results of clinical trials with these new agents in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and secondary prevention after acute coronary syndromes, providing perspectives on their future incorporation into clinical practice.

In phase III trials in atrial fibrillation, compared with warfarin, dabigatran etexilate 150 mg B.I.D. reduced the rates of stroke/systemic embolism without any difference in major bleeding; dabigatran etexilate 110 mg B.I.D. had similar efficacy with decreased bleeding; apixaban 5 mg B.I.D. reduced stroke, systemic embolism, and mortality as well as major bleeding; and rivaroxaban 20 mg Q.D. was noninferior to warfarin for stroke and systemic embolism without a difference in major bleeding.

All the agents were found to reduce intracranial haemorrhage. Edoxaban is currently being evaluated in a further large phase III trial. Apixaban and rivaroxaban were evaluated in phase III trials for prevention of recurrent ischaemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes who were mostly receiving dual antiplatelet therapy, with conflicting results on efficacy but consistent results for increased major bleeding, in the view of these authors.

The authors also assert that, although convenient to administer and manage, the agents “present challenges that need to be addressed”.

References

1. De Caterina R, Husted S, Wallentin L, et al. New oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndromes. JACC 2012;59:1413–25. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2012.02.008

Published on: May 24, 2012

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ENDORSED BY

  • ArrhythmiaAlliance
  • Stars
  • Anticoagulation Europe
  • Atrial Fibrillation Association
 

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